This is Chapter 4 of Early New Zealand Printed Maps.

  For other chapters return to the list under

   the above title  in the Contents page.


 

 

 

Contents

 

 

 

Brian Hooker

New Zealand

 

Chapter 4

 

British Hydrographic Charts

 

By

 

    Brian Hooker  

 

  

                             

Hydrographer of the Navy

The office of Hydrographer to the Admiralty was established in 1795 when Alexander Dalrymple became the first appointee to hold the post. The title later changed to Hydrographer of the Navy.

 

Hydrographers and their term in office, to 1855, were: Alexander Dalrymple, 1795-1808, Thomas Hurd 1808-1823, W. Edward Parry 1823-1829,  Francis Beaufort, 1829-1855, John Washington, 1855-63. In charts of New Zealand or parts of New Zealand the Hydrographer’s initials are inscribed within the Hydrographic Office seal.

 

All Hydrographic Office charts were printed and published in London.

 

Early chart catalogues

The first Admiralty chart catalogue was published in 1821 and the first New Zealand section was included in the 1839 issue. (See the illustration - click on the thumbnail left to enlarge.) From twelve charts in the 1839 catalogue, the New Zealand section expanded to twenty-two charts in the 1846 catalogue. 

 

Chart numbers

Chart numbers were first allocated in the 1839 Admiralty catalogue, and except for the general chart, New Zealand charts are numbered from 1089 as they are listed in the catalogue. Further chart numbers allocated to new charts are unrelated to the earlier numbering system. Since the same chart sometimes received a new number without any other changes when reprinted, the numbering system is confusing.  The same chart number sometimes extended through different editions of a chart covering the same area.  earlier New Zealand numbers.  The numbering system is confusing; sometimes in a new printing, the same chart received a new number without any other changes.  At other times, the same chart number extended through different editions of a chart covering the same area. 

 

Chart sizes

Chart sizes are indicated in Admiralty chart catalogues according to paper size.  A full-size Admiralty chart was printed on double-elephant paper (DE), giving a printed area of approximately 640 x 960 mm.  The full sheets would be subdivided into half-sheets (termed DE/2), thirds (DE/3), quarters (DE/4), and eighths (DE/8). 

 

Scale

Scales are given in the 1839 catalogue by the length in inches of geographical mile (m) or a degree (d) of latitude. 

 

Price: The price of charts changed from time to time; prices did not always increase but were sometimes reduced.  Since publication dates were often left unaltered when other data were changed, a study of price changes (in conjunction with listings in chart catalogues) can help to pinpoint the true publication date of a particular chart. 

 

Admiralty agents

Between 1821 and 1829, a number of chart sellers shared the agency for the sale of the Admiralty charts.  On 25 September 1829, R.  B. Bate was appointed sole agent.  On the death of Bate in December 1847, Mrs Bate continued the agency in her husband’s name. J. D. Potter, who had been Bates’ foreman, was appointed Chart Agent, on 20 April 1850. Thus, some of the charts listed in Chapter 5, BH1, first issued with Bates’ imprint, were later revised to replace Bates’ name with Potter’s imprint.

 

Magnetic variation

Sometimes the variation provides a guide to the date a chart was actually printed.  In a few charts the date is inserted under or near the variation figure. 

 

Views

Coastal views became a regular feature in British Admiralty charts from an early date.  Several of the charts listed in Chapter 4, BH1,  include views or coastal profiles.  Illustrations of several Hydrographic Office charts are included in Chapter 4, BH1.

Bibliography: David & Campbell, 1984; Day, 1967.

NB.  In the following list the arrangement is north to south followed by the remote islands. The chart number is given before each title although it should be noted that the number was not included in charts printed before 1839; the publication date is given last.

The sub-headings provide the name of the original surveyor, the year of the survey, the area, and the year of publication of the first issue.

J. Cook (1769-1770), New Zealand, 1816

 

Map  Bri  1 “A Chart of New Zealand, explored by Captain James Cook in 1769 & 1770 in His Majesty’s Bark the Endeavour.”  “...  1816.”  (505 x 367 mm.)

This chart was a re-issue of William Wales’ chart noted in the entry, Map  Com 1, “Commissioners of Longitude,” ????in Chapter 2.) Minor changes were made to the copper plate before fresh charts were printed with  the Hydrographer’s seal. See fig. 2.6 for an illustration of the first  state.

J. Cook et al., (1769 - c. 1836), New Zealand, 1838

Map Bri 2.2 1180 “The Islands of New Zealand Compiled from the Voyages of Captain Cook and all the Subsequent British and French Navigators” “... 1838.” (634 x 469 mm.)

This is the first state of the second edition of the general chart. The  number was changed in the copper plate, to 1212  before May 1839 when second state charts were printed (Map Bri 2.2) A third state printed in or near  1845  is without the mythical “Taranaki Bay”  Map  Bri 2.3;  A fourth  state printed with amendments in 1846 includes a note: “corrections to 1846.” (Map Bri  2.4) This issue remained current until a new edition was published in 1856.  Originally prepared under the supervision of  Francis Beaufort this  chart is virtually identical to the S.D.U.K. map  of 1838 (listed in the entry,  Map SOK 1.1, in Chapter 12, and  illustrated in, fig.12.1).

J.F.M. de Surville (1769), Doubtless Bay, c. 1804

Map Bri 3.1  1089  “Plan of the Bay of Lauriston on New-Zeland, in 34o 58' So From a French MS. December 1769 communicated by Monsr.  D’Aprés.”   “ ... 1781.” (291 x 375 mm.) (fig. 4.1 and Remarks - click on thumbnail left  below.  ) The data in this chart are derived from a survey carried out by J.F.M. de Surville, in 1769. The first Hydrographic Office issue, printed around 1804,  was also the first Admiralty chart of a part of New Zealand but the chart had been issued previously by Alexander Dalrymple. At least six states of this chart are known; an issue published after 1845 delineates Mangonui  Harbour. (Map Bri 3.6)

A. H.  Halloran (1845), Mangonui Harbour, 1847

Map Bri 4.1  1791 “New Zealand. Port Monganui in Lauriston Bay By H. Halloran Master of H.M.S. Osprey. 1845.”  “ ... 1847.” (604 x 450 mm.)

This chart remained current, with corrections, until 1898.

T. Woore (1834); F. A. Cudlip (1834), Whangaroa Harbour with an inset view, 183

Map Bri  5.1 1092 “New Zealand (North Isle) Wangeroa Bay Surveyed by Lieut Thos. Woore H.M.S. Alligator, and MR. F.A. Cudlip H.M.S.S. Buffalo. 1834” [with an inset view:]  “Entrance of Wangeroa, Distant 3½ miles”  “... 1836.” (604 x 450 mm.)

The first issue was printed without the number; the second state with the number was published in or near 1839 (Map Bri 5.2). Following Captain Stokes' survey in 1849, virtually all the earlier engraving was expunged  from the copper plate and fresh engraving took place to provide amended  data. New charts were printed in 1850 (Map Bri 5.3).

The chart remained current with corrections and additions beyond 1900.

J. de Blosseville, A Bérard, and T. de Blois (1824), Bay of Islands, 1833

Map Bri 6.1  1091 “The Bay of Islands in Eaheinomauwe, New  Zealand  from M Duperry’s [sic] Atlas 1824 [sic] ”  “... 1833.” (47 x 630 mm.)

This is an example of a British Admiralty chart modelled entirely on a French chart. The first two states were published before chart numbers were allocated. Changes to the second state include a new title and the  addition of an inset as follows: “New Zealand  (North Isle) Bay of Islands  From Surveys Made in La Coquille, M. Dupperey [sic] Commandant 1824  And l’Astrolable, M. Laplace  Commandant 1830,1,2,” -  “Continuation of the River Kawakawa”   “... 1836. (Map Bri 6.2) The third state includes the chart number (Map Bri 6.3) .The chart remained current until 1857 when it was replaced by a new chart engraved to a larger size but with the same number.

J.G. Nops (1845), Whangaruru Harbour, 1849]

Map Bri 7.1 1949  “New Zealand. Wangarurn Harbour By J.G. Nops,  Master R. N. 1845”  “... 1849.” (300 x 225 mm.)

The name was corrected to read “Wangaruru Harbour” in a reprint published probably in 1849. (Map Bri 7.2) The chart remained current until  1851 when it was replaced by chart no. 2024 following a new survey by Capt. Stokes.

J. R. Kent et al. (1820). Hokianga Harbour, 1833

Map Bri 8.1  1091 “Shookianga  River, New Zealand.  ...”  “ ... 1833.”  (290 x 210 mm.)

The name of the surveyor is not given but almost certainly the data are derived from a survey carried out  in 1820, by John Rodolphus Kent  who commanded the NSW government schooner Prince Regent.  Richard Skinner  of  HMS Dromedary may also have played a part  in the survey.  (fig. 4.2 and Remarks - click on thumbnail left  below.) A second state of the chart incorporating  alterations was published in or near  1835 (Map Bri 8.2). The title in  this issue  reads:  “New Zealand  North Isle  Shookianga River, a fine Wooding  Country, ..” The third state published in or near 1839  includes the  Chart number. (Map Bri 8.3) In the fourth state  published in or near 1850   the title  reads, “Hokianga. Harbour.” (Bri  8.4)  The chart remained current until 1857 when it was replaced by a larger chart with the same  number.

N.C. Phillips (1837), Tutukaka Harbour, 1840

Map Bri  9.1 1275   “New Zealand North I. Tutukaka Harbour and Nongodo River in The Gulf of Shouraka Surveyed By Mr. N.C. Phillips  Second Master of H.M.S., Buffalo 1837”  “ ... 1840.” (290 x 580mm.)

In early 1850, the copper plate was revised and fresh charts were printed with additional data gained from Capt. Stokes’ survey of 1849. (Map Bri  9.2) The chart remained current with revisions beyond 1900.

F. A. Cudlip (1834), Mahurangi Harbour, 1836

Map Bri 10.1 1094 “New Zealand (North Isle, Shouraka Gulf) Kiahow  Harbour Surveyed by F.A. Cudlip Mate of H.M.S.S. Buffalo Mr. F.  Sadler  Commander. 1834”  “ ... 1836.” (275 x217 mm.)

In state two, published in or near 1851, the name “Kiahow” in the title  has  been changed to “Maurhangi;” the chart number is also an addition  in this  issue (Map Bri 10.2). The chart remained current until 1852 when it was replaced by a new chart lithographed to a  larger size but  with the same number.

Cook (1769); Downie (1820); d’Urville (1827); Sadler (1834), Hauraki Gulf, 1836

Map Bri 11.1 1093 “New Zealand (North Isle) Shouraka Gulf And the Mouth Of The River Thames From the surveys of Captain James Cook  in H.M.S. Endeavour 1769, MR. James Downie in H.M.S.S. Coromandel 1820, Le Capitiane D’Urville In H.F.M.S. L’Astrolabe 1827, MR. Frederick Sadler in H.M.S.S. Buffalo 1834”  “ ... 1836”  (600 x 400 mm.)

In the second state published in or near 1840 the chart number is an addition and the Waitemata Harbour is outlined  (Map Bri 11.2).  A third state includes further changes and  a note: “Corrected to 1845” (Map Bri  11.3). In the fourth state printed in or near 1851, the earlier credit under the title to Cook’s 1769 survey, has been replaced by a new legend, “Captain J. L Stokes in H.M.S. Acheron 1849,” and an additional note read  “Corrected to 1849.” (Map Bri 11.4) Numerous changes are noticeable in this issue. “Shouraka Gulf” in the title in the issues mentioned above has been replaced by the name “Hauraka Gulf" in the fifth state published in or near 1855  (Map Bri 11.5).

P. Fisher, and P.C. Bean (1840); O. Stanley (1840), Waitemata Harbour, 1840.

Map Bri 12.1  1349  “New Zealand North Island Wai-Temata Harbour  Surveyed By Lieut. P. Fisher And P.C. Bean Master In H.M.S. Herald,  Captn. J. Nias 1840”  “ ... 1840.” (460 x 610 mm.)

It is sometimes claimed that this was the first chart published of Waitemata Harbour but Kent’s chart  pre-dates this Admiralty chart (see the entry, Map Nor 3, in Chapter 6, and  fig. 6.2 in the same chapter). Following the second Royal Navy  survey of Waitemata Harbour in September 1840, the chart was re-issued with amendments (Map Bri 12.2).  The title in state two reads:  “New Zealand North Island Wai-Temata Harbour  Surveyed By Captain Owen  Stanley H.M.S. Britomart Sandy Bay Ec By Lieut. P. Fisher And P.C. Bean Master 1840.” [with an inset view:]   “Northern Entrance to Waitemata Harbour”  “ ...  1841.” A third state published in or near 1842  includes  further data and the name,  Auckland. (Map Bri 12.3) This  chart   remained  current until 1848 when it was replaced by a new chart, engraved  to a larger size, following Capt. Stokes’ survey of the area.

G.O. Ormsby (1845), Manukau Harbour with an inset plan, 1846

Map Bri 13.1 1117 “New Zealand North Island Manukau Harbour Surveyed By G.O. Ormsby 1845” [with an inset plan:] “Sketch of Manukau Lagoon with the Harbour”  “... 1846.” (451 x 609 mm.)

This chart remained current until 1856 when it was replaced by a new chart  engraved to a larger size but with the same number.

T. Barnett (1826), Port Nicholson, 1840

Map Bri 14.1  1273  “New Zealand North Island Port Nicholson Or  Wangenueatera From A Sketch By Mr. T. Barnett 1826.”   “ ... 1840.”  (302 x 256 mm.) (fig. 4.3 and Remarks - click on the thumbnail left.)  

Two ships belonging to the first New Zealand Company’s expedition visited Port  Nicholson in May 1826; the Rosanna (J. Herd), and the  Lambton   (T. Barnett). Herd commanded the expedition which  carried  immigrants.

E.M. Chaffers (1839), Port Nicholson with an inset view, 1842

Map Bri 15.1  1423  “New Zealand North Island Port Nicholson Surveyed  By E.M. Chaffers R.N. 1839.” [with an untitled inset view]   “ ... 1842.” (615 x 465 mm.)

This was a new chart, renumbered, and engraved to a larger size.  Chaffers commanded the second New Zealand Company’s ship, Tory. A second  state of the chart includes the note: “Additions to 1849” (Map Bri 15.2). This edition remained current until 1856 when  it  was replaced by a new chart  engraved to a larger size but with the same number.

G. Johnson (1837), Port Underwood in Cloudy Bay, 1840

Map Bri 16.1  1272  “New Zealand South I. Port Underwood In Cloudy  Bay Surveyed By Mr. G. Johnson, Master Of  H.M.S. Conway  CaptC.R.  Bethune 1837.”  “ ... 1840.” (310 x 250 mm.)

At the time of the Conway’s visit, Cloudy Bay was the centre of  intense whaling activity. The chart remained current until 1859.

E.M. Chaffers (1839), Tory Channel, 1841

Bri 17.1  1422  (Subsequently no. 1414.)  “New Zealand Tory Channel From a Sketch By E.M. Chaffers R.N. 1839.”  “ ... 1841.” (238 x 366 mm) 

Charts printed in 1841 were numbered 1422 but in a second  printing the number was changed to 1414  (Map Bri 17.2.  The chart remained current until 1859.

T. Woore (1834), Port Gore, 1836

Map Bri 18.1  1098 “New Zealand (South Isle, Cook Strait) Port Gore  Surveyed by Lieut. Woore H.M.S. Alligator, 1834.”  “... 1836.” (230 x 280 mm.)

The first state was printed before chart numbers were allocated in 1839; the second state includes the number 1098 (Map Bri 18.2).  The chart remained current until 1859.

P.E. Guilbert (1827), Current Basin with an inset view, 1836

Map Bri 19.1 1096 “New Zealand (Cook’s Strait) Current Basin surveyed by M. Guilbert Enseigne de l’Astrolabe M. D’Urville Capitaine 1827.”  [with an inset view:] “The French Pass from the S.W.”  “ ... 1836.”  (230 x 268 mm.)

This is another example of a British Admiralty chart modelled entirely on a French survey (see details of the original French printed chart  listed in entry, Map Dep 14.1 in Chapter 5.)  The first state was  printed before chart numbers were allocated in 1839. The second state, printed in or near 1839, includes the number “1096”  (Map Bri 19.2).  A third state shows a  price change from “1s.” to  “Sixpence”  (Map Bri 19.3).  The  chart remained current until 1857 when it was  replaced by a new  chart engraved to a larger size but with the same  number.

T. Woore (1834), Port Hardy with an inset view, 1836

Map Bri 20.1 1095  “New Zealand (D’Urville I. Cook Strait) Port Hardy Surveyed by Lieut. T. Woore H.M.S. Alligator 1834” [with an  inset view:]   “Entrance of Port Hardy.”  “ ... 1836.” (280 x 220 mm.)

The first issue was printed before chart numbers were allocated in 1839. An example of a second state printed in or near 1839 has not been found but  prints belonging to a third state published after 1846 are known (Map Bri 20.3). The chart remained current until 1859.

P.E. Guilbert (1827), Tasman Bay - western shore, 1836

Map Bri 21.1 1097 “New Zealand (Cook Strait) Blind Bay Western Shore Surveyed by M. Guilbert Enseigne de l’Astrolabe 1827.”  “ ... 1836.” (310 x 200 mm.)

This chart is mainly modelled on two French charts prepared by P.E. Guilbert and published in Dumont d’Urville’s  Atlas Hydrographique, dated 1833 (see the charts listed in entry, Map Dep 12.1, and entry, Map Dep 13.1 in Chapter 5.) The chart was first published before chart numbers were allocated in 1839. The second state includes the number “1097.”  (Map Bri 21.2)  Before the third state was printed, in 1846,  the copper plate was altered to provide a new title as follows: “New Zealand Torrent Bay And Astrolabe Road On The West Shore Of Blind Bay Surveyed by M. Guilbert Enseigne de l’Astrolabe 1827”  (Map Bri 21.3).

The chart remained current until  1858 when a new chart was published and Guilbert’s work was incorporated as an inset.

O. Stanley (1840), Pigeon Bay, Banks Peninsula, 1845

Map Bri 22.1  1694 “New Zealand sketch of Wakaroa By Commr. O. Stanley H.M.S. Britomart, 1840.”   “ ... 1845.” (250 x 180 mm.) (fig. 4.4 and Remarks - click on the  thumbnail left.)  

This chart remained current until 1852 when a new chart, no. 1999, replaced it.

J.M. Fournier (1838), Lyttelton Harbour and Port Levy with an inset view, 1844.

Map Bri 23.1  1595 “New Zealand South Island Tokolabo And Koko-Rarata Bays Surveyed By M. Fournier In The French Corvette L’Heroine 1840” [with an untitled view of the entrance to Lyttelton Harbour]   “ ... 1844.” (208 x 317 mm.)

This chart is a further example of a British Admiralty chart modelled on a French work. Fournier’s chart was published by the Dépôt-général de la Marine, Paris, in 1840. (see the chart listed in entry, Map Dep 24, in Chapter 5.)  The BA chart remained current until 1852, when it was replaced by Chart no. 1999, following Capt. Stokes’ surveys.

O. Stanley (1840), Akaroa Harbour with an inset view, 1844

Map Bri 24.1 1575 “New Zealand South Island Akaroa Harbour Commr. Owen Stanley 1840” [with an untitled coastal view] ... 1844.”  (300 x 205 mm.)

The data in this chart are derived from a survey carried out by Commander Owen Stanley when he brought HMS Britomart into Akaroa Harbour on a visit, in August 1840. The chart remained current, with minor alterations, until 1874.

W.L. Edwardson (1822), Henrietta Bay, Ruapuke Island, 1840

Map Bri 25.1 1328 “New Zealand South Isle Rouabouki Road From A Sketch Communicated By Lieut. Orlando Wilson R.N. 1839.”  “ ... 1840.”  (260 x 290 mm.)

The data in this chart are derived from a survey carried out by Capt. William Lawrence Edwardson who commanded the NSW government sloop Snapper, in 1822, although Edwardson is not credited as the author. The chart remained current until 1855.

W.L.Edwardson (1822), G. Vancouver (1791), et al., south-west New Zealand, and  Dusky Sound with Chalky Inlet, 1833

Map Bri 26.1 1099 (2 charts on one sheet) “South Point of T’Avai Poenammoo New Zealand From M Duperry’s [sic]  Atlas 1829. [sic (fig. 4.5 and Remarks - click on the  thumbnail left.)   // Dusky Bay From Vancouver’s Voyage and Port Chalky From M. Duperry’s [sic] Atlas.”  “... 1833.” (fig. 6. and Remarks - click on the  thumbnail right.)  (272 x 340 mm. - overall).

The section titled  “South Point ...”  is modelled on a chart included in Duperrey’s Atlas Hydrographie  (Paris, 1827), (see the chart listed in entry, Map Dep 6a.1, in Chapter 5). The data in the French chart are derived from a survey carried out by W.L. Edwardson in 1822.

The section titled “ ... Dusky Bay ...” is modelled partly on a chart in Duperrey’s Atlas Hydrographique  (Paris, 1827), (see the chart listed in entry, Map Dep 6c.1, in Chapter 5), and partly on sketches which are derived from surveys carried out during Vancouver’s visit in 1791, (see the chart listed in  entry, Map Rob 1a, in Chapter 3, and fig. 3.1). The chart was reprinted in or near 1834 with alterations; the errors in the spelling of Duperrey and the date of the atlas in this third state have been corrected. The title on the left now reads: “South Point of T’Avai Poenammoo By M. de Blosseville From M. Duperrey’s Atlas 1824.” (Map Bri 26.2)  A third state printed in or after 1839 includes the chart number. (Map Bri 26.3) This state also includes notes relating to the visit of John Balleny to Port Pegasus. In a fourth state published after June 1840, the titles within the charts have been amended to read: “South West Extreme Of New Zealand From M. Duperrey’s Atlas 1824. // Dusky Bay From Vancouver’s voyage and Chalky Bay From M. Duperrey’s Atlas” (Map Bri 26.4). In a fifth state the titles have been  further amended to read: “New Zealand, South Isle The South West Extremity Of New Zealand From M.  Duperrey’s Atlas 1824. // Dusky Bay From Cook’s 2d. Voyage And Chalky Bay From M. Duperrey’s Atlas” (Map Bri 26.5). The chart remained current until 1858.

D.F. Bauzá  (1793), Doubtful Harbour; G. Vancouver (1791), Anchor Island Harbour; W.R. Broughton (1791), Facile Harbour; J. Cook (1773), Pickersgill Harbour, 1840

Map Bri 27.1 1281 (4 charts on one sheet) “New Zealand South Island Doubtful Harbour By Don Felipe Bauza in The Descubierta 1793.” (fig. 4.7 and Remarks - click on the thumbnail left.) // “Anchor Island Harbour From Vancouver’s Voyage 1791” // “Facile Harbour From Vancouver’s Voyage 1791”  “Pickersgill Harbour From Vancouver’s Voyage  1791”   “ ... 1840” (198 x 236 mm. - overall)

The data in the Doubtful Harbour plan are derived from a survey carried out by Don Felipe Bauzá during the visit by the Spanish expedition of D.A. Malaspina, in February 1793. The data in the Facile Harbour plan are derived from a survey carried out by W.R. Broughton, during Vancouver’s visit in 1791. The data in the plan of Pickersgill Harbour are derived from Cook’s survey of 1773 - not Vancouver’s visit as noted in the first state of the chart; however, the model used by the engraver for this section was most likely Vancouver’s engraved chart (see the details in entry, Map Rob 1a, in Chapter 3, and fig. 3.1). In or near 1841 the chart was reprinted with a correction to the Pickersgill Harbour title: “From Captn Cook’s Voyage 1773” (Map Bri 27.2).  The chart remained  current until 1858 when it was added to Chart no. 2589.

J.M. Fournier (1838), Chatham Islands with 2 inset views and 2 inset charts. 1840

Map Bri  28.1 1417  “Chatham Islands Compiled from a plan by M. Fournier Lieutenant De l’Heroine 1840 and from a sketch by Mr. Charles Heaphy Draftsman to the New Zealand Company 1840” [with 2 views and 3 inset charts:] [i] “Port Hutt” [ii, is an untitled view looking towards Waitangi Beach and Port Waitangi] [iii]  “Kangaroa Or Skirmish Bay” [iv] “Port Waitangi” [v]  “Port Hutt”  “ ... 1842.” (470 x 610 mm.)

Charles Heaphy visited the Chatham Islands in 1840. Fournier’s plan had been published by the Dépôt-général de la Marine, Paris, in 1840 (see the entry, Map Dep 25a, in Chapter 5).

A. Bristow (1806), Auckland Islands; F. Hazelburgh (1810), Campbell Island, 1823

Map Bri 29.1 1114 (2 charts on one sheet)  “A sketch of Lord Auckland’s Groupe Discovered by Abrm. Bristow  Commander of the Ship Ocean, South Whaler 1806” // “A Sketch of Campbell’s Island Discovered by Mr. Fredk.  Hazelburgh of the Brig Perseverance 1810.”   “ ... 1823.”  (285 x 187 mm.)

This chart was first published before numbers were allocated in 1839. The second state published in or after 1839 includes the number 1114 (Map Bri 29.2). The chart remained current until after 1895.


Bibliography Chapter 4

Day, A. 1967 The Admiralty Hydrographic Service 1795-1919. London: Her Majesty’s Stationery Office.

Hargreaves, R.P. 1969 Nineteenth Century British Hydrographic Charts of New  Zealand. Dunedin: University of Otago Press.

Hooker, Brian. 1988 "Official  general charts of New Zealand 1772-1885" The Journal of Navigation 41 (1): 35-51.

----------------- . 1993  "Finding Port Nicholson; A new look at European discovery and naming claims"  The Mariner’s Mirror,  vol 79, No. 2, 179-91.

Ritchie, G.S. 1968 The Admiralty Chart. 2nd impr., London: Hollis & Carter.

Ross, J.O’C. 1969 This Stern Coast. Wellington: A.H. & A.W. Reed.

Spencer, Jeremy. Appendix 1, "Charts and drawings associated with the Voyage of the "St Jean Baptiste", in Early Eyewitness Accounts of Maori Life -1 – Extracts from Journals Relating to the Visit to New Zealand of the French Ship St Jean Baptiste in December 1769 Under the Command of J. F. M.  de Surville (Translation &  transcription by Isabel Ollivier and Cheryl Hingley), Wellington: Alexander Turnbull Library Endowment Trust in association with the National Library of New Zealand, 1982.


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